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Cornelison year in review!

December 24, 2005 by Herald Leader  
Filed under Mark Cornelison

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Being that this was the first year of us doing a “multimedia” presentation, I looked forward to learning how to do it. I must admit, one of the harder parts would be the cutting up of the music to enhance the photos but, like Janet said, we learned in the 11th hour we could not use copyrighted music. Fortunately I had already bypassed this problem. Shooting so many local bands and concerts I contacted my friends who form the band “The Apparitions” and asked if I could use one of their songs, “Emilio” as background for my photos. They gave me an emphatic yes and so it plays on in its entirety. That actually turned out to be the easy part after all. Picking 20-30 photos that I felt represented my year was a little tough, but kind of satisfying at the same time. With so many assignments year after year, it is nice to look back on the year and see it as a complete body of work. Like I say in my show, I know I do ALOT of sports but when I see the other stuff I have done like the Biloxi MS coverage, the Taylor Made Farm stuff, and the Sweet Corn package, it reminds me that I am possibly more well rounded than I sometimes think. At least I hope I am. Guess you all can be the judge after watching the show!

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Multimedia Debut

December 23, 2005 by Herald Leader  
Filed under Web/Camera Tech

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This month we had a crash course on how to piece together a multimedia show, accompanied by all the joy and frustration that comes with learning a new skill. Choosing my favorite pictures and music was the easy part. Feeling my way through the new software was somewhat cumbersome, only because I had never used GarageBand or Soundslides before. The really frustrating part was finding out at the last minute that copyright laws do not allow us to use up to 30 seconds of a song like we had originally thought. So I trashed my carefully crafted masterpiece and went back to the drawing board, or in this case, my computer. In record time I meticulously wove snippets of guitar and piano music into a blanket of sound to soften my voice and help the photos flow better. I think it turned out pretty good for a first attempt and I promise next time will be even better.

Check it out at heraldleaderphoto.com

Uphill Training

December 20, 2005 by Herald Leader  
Filed under Blog

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Go to Monday’s December 20, 2005 Kentucky.com or the Lexington Herald-Leader to learn about a new method of training horses. Hurricane Hall Farm, located in Lexington, Kentucky has installed a 6-furlong course that is a straightaway and is uphill. The surface has the new synthetic Polytrack, which is usable in all kinds of weather. David Hanley, trainer at Hurricane Hall, brought the concept of a straightaway galloping uphill with him from Ireland. Hanley says that by exercising uphill, horses transfer their weight to their hind legs, Consequently, they don’t experience the daily pounding on their front legs that they do on a flat surface. Hanley also can drive alongside each set of horses as they jog and gallop on the course, quite different from the practice at racetracks, where trainers watch from stationary position around the track. For occasional work around turns, he can take his horses to Keeneland Race Track, which also is in Lexington. I spent a couple of hours with Hanley as he drove alongside the training horses and captured the horses as they galloped uphill from the interior of his SUV, shooting with a Nikon D2H, 200asa, 500th of a second at 5.6 with a 80-200 zoom and a 28-70 zoom lens. The day was a learning experience and very enjoyable until I was walking to my vehicle and a dog came up from behind and thought that my left calf was suitable for eating. Fortunately the canine was up on its shots.

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Coach sets a pick

December 19, 2005 by Herald Leader  
Filed under Charles Bertram

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To most fans, photographers appear to have the best seats in the house. Except for the referees, there is usually nobody between photographers and the action on the court. On Saturday, UK Coach Tubby Smith added an unusual obstacle for photographers shooting from the end zone photo positions. For a few plays, Coach Smith stationed himself directly in front of the photographers. Fellow Herald-Leader photographer Mark Cornelison (second photographer from the right) was fortunate in that Coach Smith didn’t block his view but the photographers on the left side weren’t so lucky. But like most coaches, Tubby doesn’t stay still very long and he quickly returned to pacing the sidelines. Charles Bertram/Staff

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The Block!

December 18, 2005 by Herald Leader  
Filed under Mark Cornelison

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There are key shots in every game. Not just shots the players are taking on the court but also the shots we are taking of the players taking those shots. Sounds confusing, I know.
We are always looking to get the photos of shots that made an impact in the game. Jump shooters have defenders coming at them from all angles. The photographers have referees coming from all directions. Anticipation is a big part of being a good sports photographer. You see a play developing, hopefully you are familiar with certain player’s tendencies, and are ready for whatever comes next. Except for the referee who is running down the baseline trying to get in position to call the play. He is trying to do his job and we are trying to do ours. The two don’t always work out for the best for both parties involved. All you can do is keep shooting, do your job, and get the shot the best you can.

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