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Site seeing!

March 18, 2006 by Mark Cornelison  
Filed under Mark Cornelison, Snappers, Sports

Coyleandcorn
One of the perks of the job is to visit different cities and do a little site seeing. The thing is when you are with other photographers some of the cool sites are created on the spot, not necessarily going to a historic place. I am in Philadelphia for NCAA basketball and today me and some other photographers, David Coyle from UK Athletics, and Bill Luster from the Courier-Journal thought we would do a little site seeing for two reasons. One, to see if there were any UK fans around who we could photograph on the day off should the Cats win, and two, we thought we better check out some of the historic sites just in case Kentucky lost on Friday night because then we would be leaving on Saturday. We started out by going to see the Liberty Bell. It did feel a little funny going to see the “Liberty” Bell and being scanned and x-rayed before being able to go in. Once inside we took a few photos and kept our eyes open for any UK fans. We were there about 1/2 hour and did not see one UK fan anywhere. It did not bode well for the fan search on Saturday but we moved on just the same. We saw Independence Hall, then headed for lunch at a place called “Jones” where we had a little wait. As we waited we noticed this awesome piece of frosted glass and the cool silhouettes as people came in. I decided to model a bit and struck a few poses behind the glass as Bill shot some photos. Once I came back in, Coyle and I leaned into the frame and were illuminated by some red heat lamps making a pretty cool and fun photo. A nice souvenir from Philadelphia showing it doesn’t have to be a landmark to be cool!

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Multimedia from the Boys’ Sweet 16

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Herald-Leader reporter Todd VanCampen and Helena Hau, from our imaging desk, (pictured above in a photo by Charles Bertram) have been working hard behind the scenes of the Boys’ Sweet 16 basketball tournament at Rupp Arena this week to bring our internet viewers something they have never had before in our basketball coverage – sound. We’ve mentioned multimedia frequently in our blog posts, and we felt like this coverage deserves a mention here as well. We’ve been getting a few questions about how we are producing it, so here’s a technical behind-the-scenes, how-it’s-done explanation.

As the photographers (David Stephenson, Charles Bertram, Frank Anderson, and freelancer Jo Rey Au – also in the picture above) are shooting the game. Helena and Todd are gathering ambient sound of fans or other arena noises. Between games, Helena begins to assemble the sound in Soundtrack Pro while Todd writes up a brief game wrap-up. Todd records himself reading the game notes and Helena incorporates that into her edit.

We primarily use two pieces of software for our online galleries: Soundslides and Slideshowpro. Soundslides is a great application for pairing audio with images, but we decided to stick with our usual way of displaying our game albums since Slideshowpro gives us the option of having sound or not.

Within an hour or two after a game when the sound and images are completely edited to a predetermined length and number, the show is uploaded to the internet for the fans to enjoy. In addition to our first-ever multimedia coverage of the Sweet 16, reporter Mike Fields is blogging all through the tournament.

-David Stephenson

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Sigh of Relief

March 15, 2006 by Janet Worne  
Filed under Blog

I think the majority of the staff here breathed a collective sigh of relief on Monday when it was announced that McClatchy had won the bid to buy Knight Ridder. We have been on pins and needles since shareholders had first demanded the sale. Who would buy us? Will it be a company that respects and encourages ethical journalism? Will it be a company that treats its employees fairly? All of this anxiety was coupled with a sense of grief over the slow demise of the newspaper in our society.

Enter McClatchy and its white knight CEO, Gary B. Pruitt, who still believes in journalism and believes in the future of newspapers–coupled of course–with the online component. It was the best news we could have hoped for.

I am realistic enough to know and accept that my job is changing—fast. But most of it is exciting. We are learning new skills and we have new opportunities to display our work. And now that I know that our parent company will continue to have the right values and goals I can relax and enjoy my future in journalism—in whatever form it takes.

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Nuestro Kentucky

March 14, 2006 by Pablo Alcala  
Filed under Pablo Alcalá

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This photo of Froylan Gonzalez loading up the tortilla machine at Tortilleria Ramirez on Alexandria Drive is an outtake from the upcoming Nuestro Kentucky column scheduled for publication on April 5. Immigration is a big story around here, but like many issues, when we have a headline about it in our news section, it is exposing a problem or debate. These stories are needed and we could probably do more of them. We started Nuestro Kentucky to get the fun, interesting side of our Latino community in the paper more often.

Like many Latinos, I showed up in Lexington five years ago for a job. Being from south Texas, I was not used to a “Mexican food aisle” at the grocery store. Hot sauce was right there with the ketchup and tortillas were in the bread section. Most grocery stores had a big tortilla-making machine behind the deli case, so you could get them while they were still hot. There are Mexican towns just across the border like Reynosa and Matamoros, where several little storefronts on the main shopping streets sell hot stacks of corn tortillas wrapped in newspaper for a quarter.

Naturally, one of the first places I found when I moved here was Tortilleria Ramirez. I didn’t ask how many calories were in their tortillas or if they used lard or organic corn meal, but I saw steam inside the bag of tortillas, so I bought them. While there is nothing wrong with the tortillas at the grocery store here in the little section of the “Mexican food aisle”, it makes a big difference to many people who move here to have such an important staple made fresh daily.

I hope to keep the column light and informative while concentrating on the culture and personalities through photography.

Model: NIKON D2H
Lens (mm): 17
ISO: 640
Aperture: 5.6
Shutter: 1/30
Exp. Comp.: +0.3
Flash Comp.: +0.0
Program: Manual
Focus Mode: AF-C
White Bal.: FLUORESCENT (gel on flash)

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“Real” moments

March 13, 2006 by Mark Cornelison  
Filed under Mark Cornelison

I was assigned this week to shoot the awarding of the Lexington Firefighter of the Year. Charles Bradshaw was this year’s recipient and the awards were given at the Lexington Fire Training Center. I got there about 40 minutes early hoping to find out whom the winner was and find him being congratulated by friends and family before the ceremony. My thinking was, when we are faced with photographing someone walking up on a stage and receiving an award it is NOT the best photos. It is especially bad when the old “grip and grin” happens as the winner shakes hands with the presenter of the award and they look at the camera and smile. Now, I know this is a photo the winner will probably cherish and for that purpose it is great, but for our purposes it isn’t. I like to look for that 1/2 second of a real moment that tells the story a little better. That is our job as news photographers. I am not doing my job if I give you the same moment you see on all three TV channels that are set up around the room, so I kept looking and moving around. Once I found Mr. Bradshaw and his family I locking in on them waiting, and hoping. As the list of accomplishments were being read, and the list was long, Charles Sr, reached over to Charles Jr, and touched fists before heading to the stage to accept his well deserved award. To me, I had just shot the key moment of the day. Sure, I shot the actual giving of the award and the shaking of hands photos, but to me that was all a bit standard and was not what I hoped would be in the paper. It is just another way of trying to show the readers what is going through our heads at news events. It would be easy to walk in and shoot the obvious photo, but we are trying to give you a little more. Not always successful, but always trying.060310firefighteramc052_1

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