From the staff of the Lexington Herald-LeaderKentucky.comSubscribe to Heraldleaderphoto.comNews FeedSubscribe to Heraldleaderphoto.comComments

Having a Ball

May 25, 2006 by David Perry  
Filed under David Perry

060524gradtccdp224

I’ve posted an outtake of a beach ball being batted about during the recessional at the Tates Creek graduation this week. I did not turn this photo in to the editors because I felt that its use would encourage further efforts to break the decorum of graduations in the future. But, I must admit, I WOULD have turned in a photo of say, someone shooting off a Roman candle! So maybe I don’t care about decorum as much as I thought. A Roman candle would have been newsworthy because of its inherent dangerousness. It’s not the media’s responsibility as to the behavior of those we photograph. But still, I don’t know if the antics of a couple of grads that sneaked in two beach balls warrants inclusion into 100,000 homes.

In the 1970s, grads took delight in other antics like releasing live mice, or writing “cute” sayings on their mortarboards, and we, the media, ate it up. But now, I just don’t know.
Another take on promoting bad behavior came to mind also. What if I had done a sound and slide multimedia presentation of the Tates Creek graduation? The Class of 2006 specifically asked, in the program, for audience members NOT to yell and clap as names were called, as a courtesy to other grads whose names might be covered up by all the noise. Well, a significant number of, I assume, relatives and friends of the grads chose to ignore that request and yelled like crazy! So, is including THAT kind of “bad” behavior in a sound clip also just encouraging it? What do you think? Interesting, though, that both students and the adult audience chose to ignore the decorum of the occasion.

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Preakness tradgedy

May 20, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under David Stephenson, Sports

060520preaknesssds302_6

Barbaro’s race for the Triple Crown ended almost as soon as the Preakness began on Saturday. The Kentucky Derby winner fractured his leg in two places and was taken to an equine hospital about an hour from the track for emergency surgery.

As we’ve mentioned in other posts in the blog, it’s never easy to see something like this. It’s not easy shooting it either. Emotions are high, adrenaline is pumping, and it’s chaotic. Fans were crying and screaming, fearing that the horse would be put down right there on the track. I think most everyone there forgot there was even a race still running. You can click here to see a slideshow from the race.

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

The Middle Jewel

May 20, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under Charles Bertram

060519barbaroads093
Canon 1D MkII, 300mm f/4, 250th sec @ f/5, 400 ASA

I’m breaking my maiden at the Preakness this year. I’ve covered plenty of Derbys and a fair number of Belmonts – but never the Preakness. Mike Marten, who covers thoroughbred racing year-round for publications like the Daily Racing Form and Horsephotos.com, convinced me that I needed to go to the Fair Hill Training Center Friday morning to shoot Barbaro before he shipped to Pimlico in Baltimore. We left the hotels before 5 a.m. and drove an hour to the training center. A beautiful sunrise quickly turned to a solid rain just as Barbaro headed to the track for his jog with trainer Michael Matz at his side.

060519barbaroads257
Canon 30D, 16-35mm f2.8, 400th sec. @ f/8, 200 ASA

About eight hours later, quite a different scene awaited Barbaro as he arrived at Pimilico Race Course. He left his peacful and quiet home for the chaos of Pimlico. His arrival time was no secret and scores of media were there to witness and document his arrival. I decided to take a little gamble and took a hight vantage point on a balcony where there were no other photographers (at least at first there weren’t). I figured the spectacle of his arrival was best covered with a wide angle, and being above it seemed to be the best way to see it all.

060519barbaroads270
Canon 30D, 16-35mm f2.8, 1/40th @f8, 200 ASA

After shooting Barbaro’s walk from the truck to the barn, photogs crowded under an awning to get a view of him in his stall. So I had to take my turn at it.

060519barbaroads317b
Canon 30D, 16-35mm f2.8, 1/60th @f2.8, 400 ASA

Barbaro was assigned to stall #40, traditionally reserved for the Derby winner.

060519barbaroads239

Speaking of Mike Marten, here’s a snapper of him being hosed by a water truck with the help of Getty photographer Matt Stockman during the photographer’s meeting Friday morning.

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Flavors of Kentucky

May 18, 2006 by Mark Cornelison  
Filed under Mark Cornelison

As I continue to recover from a long Derby week of early mornings it is back to business as usual. Before leaving for the Derby I was working closely with Herald-Leader food writer Sharon Thompson on a cookbook called “Flavors of Kentucky”, tentatively due out in late fall. Sharon and I had just over two weeks to do the entire book, photo wise, before I left for Derby. It was a pretty intensive 2+ weeks with Sharon cooking 7-8 dishes a day at her house for me to photograph and on other days we traveled around the State photographing special dishes at historic Kentucky restaurants like Boone Tavern and the Brown Hotel to name a few. On other days we found ourselves in places like Poosey Ridge photographing at the Blue Moon Garlic farm you see here.
041706mark14523.
Going out into different parts of the State was a lot of fun and gave me a chance to take my girlfriend, and photographer, Amy Wallot with us, who, being from northern Michigan had not seen a lot of rural Kentucky. While with us she snapped a few photos of us to document the event!
041706mark14577
Photos by: Amy Wallot

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Visit to the office of Anthropomorphology

May 18, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under David Stephenson

060509folkartfds291

A little creepy to some, perhaps, but to Cecil Ison it’s a study. Stay tuned to see an upcoming audio slideshow with more photos of Mr. Ison’s collection of discarded baby dolls and his explanation behind their demise.

This is why I love my job.

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Next Page »