From the staff of the Lexington Herald-LeaderKentucky.comSubscribe to Heraldleaderphoto.comNews FeedSubscribe to Heraldleaderphoto.comComments

My Kentucky Home Remodeled

June 30, 2006 by Pablo Alcala  
Filed under Blog

060629houseapa174

Model: NIKON D2H
Lens (mm): 17
ISO: 640
Aperture: 4.5
Shutter: 1/100
Exp. Comp.: +0.3
Sisters Jessica Chrystal, 12,  left and  Kennae Chrystal,16, look in the mirror of their mother’s master bathroom.  The family was on a tour of their home which was remodeled by several local organizations after Kennae wrote a letter for the contest describing their situation where single mother LaTonya Chrystal slept on the couch so that all her six children could use the bedrooms.   The field was narrowed down to five finalists and the Chrystal family was chosen by on-line voting. 

You can never know for sure what to expect from scheduled events like this.  Did the press release exaggerate the size of the event, the scope of the remodeling or will the family be genuinely deserving of the gift?  Sometimes we have to work to find a real situation among the pretending. 

In this case, the event was  everything  promised and more. Everyone in the block turned out for the event.  The re-modelers and designers went all out.  They added about a third more house in square footage.  The home was completely refurnished and remodeled, and not on a shoestring budget. The children have great new rooms, LaTonya has her own bedroom and bathroom and some much deserved privacy.

Everyone I met involved in this project donated time and money to create a beautiful home sparing no expense.  Capturing the reactions from the family was truly one of those "I love my job" moments.

060629houseapa177

Model: NIKON D2H
Firmware: Adobe Photoshop 7.0
Lens (mm): 32
ISO: 640
Aperture: 4.5
Shutter: 1/180
Exp. Comp.: +0.3
ICC Profile: Adobe RGB (1998)

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Goose Encounter

June 26, 2006 by Janet Worne  
Filed under Blog

060626gooseaw268
One of the great things about my job is that I get to try a little of everything. Today I held a Canada goose just after it had been banded at the Salato Game Farm in Frankfort. I even learned how to calm it down. You simply tuck its head under a wing, like I’m doing here in this photo taken by Mark Marraccine, and it immediately goes to sleep or into some sort of trance. Kind of like when I rub my dog’s belly. Fun stuff…

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

This period isn’t the end.

June 25, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under David Stephenson

060624renfairads474

It’s the beginning for Kentucky’s newest fair, called the Highland Renaissance Festival in Eminence.

Herald-Leader intern Andy Huggins and I drove to the site just north of Shelbyville on Saturday to photograph and record audio of the many shows and activities scheduled for the day. Hard to miss were the cast of the Muckmasters, of which Mia Seitz (pictured above holding her daughter Ruby) is a member. They perform a theatrical production, largely in a mud pit.

You can see the audio slide show at heraldleaderphoto.com.

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Lexington From 2,000 Feet

June 22, 2006 by Janet Worne  
Filed under Behind the Photo, Web/Camera Tech

060621versaillesaw202
Lexington from 2,000 feet is an eye-opening site. When you drive by a new development under construction, you see a sign. Beyond that, you get a glimpse of freshly scraped earth and the skeletal beginnings of houses and businesses. But you never really see the scope of what is being done until you see it from the air.

Yesterday I rented an airplane and flew over some construction sites around Lexington and Versailles. I’m always conflicted about taking aerial photographs. The view is great and it’s fun, but it always leaves me a bit queasy. So, I took my Dramamine and packed a plastic bag with my gear.

It was beautiful weather and my pilot, Dan, was a master at maneuvering the plane into just the right position to get the pictures I needed. I always ask for a plane with overhead wings and a window that will open. The open window makes better pictures and had the added benefit of keeping the cabin tolerably cool on a hot day.

The photo above is of new developments South of Hamburg Place. The road that is running along the left is I-75 and the view is looking North toward the shopping area. I shot it on a wide-angle zoom set at 17mm. The ISO was 400, the aperture was set to f/4.5 and the shutter speed was at 3,000th of a second.

Not much green space left, is there?

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Planet Bonnaroo!

June 21, 2006 by Mark Cornelison  
Filed under Behind the Photo, Mark Cornelison

Manchester, Tennessee??? Ever heard of it? Me either, until last week when I went with Jamie Gumbrecht – Ms. It’s All About – and we headed there for the Bonnaroo Music Festival. Turns out Bonnaroo is one of, if not the largest, music festival going on these days drawing 90,000 people to the 700 acre farm in rural Tennessee. I have been to events and games before that had 100,000 people but those people were always in the stands or somehow separated from the event I was covering. But not at Bonnaroo. Jamie and I were caught in the current of the “sea of humanity” making it’s way from stage to stage! It was quite a trip. (See our audio slide show here)060616bonnaroofmc023
The show’s lineup was not all to my taste but was cool just the same. Artists ranging from Tom Petty, (my taste), to Cypress Hill, (taste?), cranked out the tunes and heavy bass lines enough to shake the fields we walked across in 90+ degree heat. The sun was brutal! Many people flocked to the large fountains to get soaked with water and get some relief. Sadly, with Canon cameras around my neck I did not feel safe doing this so I just suffered.
Petty_mc1

The first day we went to cover the shows, Friday, we arrived around 9:00 or so local time and began the trek in from the day parking area to the media trailer. Shows would begin around 2:00 and we could get our bearings and figure out where we, as press, needed to be. We would find that stuff was spread all over and the walk from the car to the press trailer alone was close to a mile each way. With computers and cameras it felt longer.

As the day went on, I tried to shoot from different areas from the crowd and not necessarily the photo pit. The photo pit turned out to be the cleanest shot without all the heads in front, but apparently whoever was credentialing photographers decided to give a photo pass to anyone who had a camera, including point-and-shoot cameras. This proved to be a hassle, as I would be framing up a shot only to have someone hold their Sure-shot up over their head trying to get a good angle with a camera that was not made to handle the intense stage lights contrasted with black backgrounds. The result was nice black backgrounds and totally blown out performers for the point-and-shooters. The worst part of the day came when I remembered Jamie had told me the band she was covering was My Morning Jacket, and they played at MIDNIGHT. This scheduling of course thrilled me and when the shows, which I was shooting for the day, were slowing down, I went and lay down amongst the throngs of people seeking shade and resting under some of the few trees on the farm. I enjoyed a $5 slice of pizza and another $5 bottle of water and relaxed for a while. Midnight was still 7 hours away and I felt every minute of it pass.

When midnight came and My Morning Jacket was about to begin I staked out a spot on the outer edge to shoot with a 300 2.8 and 1.4 converter. Knowing the light would be tough I took my ASA up to 800 to start with. Just as the show was about to begin the 15 fans in front of me decided to climb up on the trashcans and completely block my view! I quickly moved to the side, dodging people sitting on blankets and started to shoot. Jim James, the lead singer seemed to have felt my pain of the poor lighting and simply came out with a camping lantern! Was that supposed to help? It was VERY dark and I ratcheted down my shutter speed trying to get the moment. I feel certain had I not been shooting on RAW I would not have been able to pull it off.
060616bonnaroofmc475
The Saturday was better for us. We knew our way around, knew the schedules, didn’t have any midnight shows, and the night ended with Radiohead, who I kept calling Coldplay, by mistake. I guess there is not much of a comparison. Took a few chances on Radiohead and got a few nice shots.
Radiohead_mc3_1

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Next Page »