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Coming Home

July 31, 2006 by Janet Worne  
Filed under Blog

It’s nearly midnight and I’m sitting in the Atlanta Airport waiting for my flight to Lexington that has been delayed by more than an hour. I know you’re all wildly interested in this, so I thought I’d write a note to ease my boredom.

I’m coming home from a vacation in New Mexico where I was visiting family and friends. I know this was supposed to be a vacation from WORK, but is photography ever really work? I took lots of pictures of the landscape, as well as the usual family stuff. I couldn’t help myself.

I took this picture from the backyard of a friend’s house in Corrales with an Olympus Camedia C-5050 compact digital camera. His view of the Sandia Mountains is spectacular.

I’ll be back at work in the morning and somehow I don’t think I’ll see any scenery like this. But I am fond of the green rolling hills of Kentucky.

060723nmexajw156

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Shadow Play

July 24, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under David Stephenson, Sports

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Brothers Elijahwon, left, and Tay Guyn watch the shadows of players in a pick up game of basketball on a set of courts off Cooper Drive in Lexington on Monday, July 24. 1/500th, f/9, 200 ASA, Canon 30D, 16-35 f2.8.

Sometimes we’re asked to find a good photo that can “stand alone” without a story. Late in the day today, I needed to come up with a photo to take the place of one of our centerpiece stories which fell through at the last minute.

I had another assignment at the 5/3 Tennis Championships which are right next door to these basketball courts. I’ve driven by these courts countless times and always thought there was potential for a good photo. The light was good when I showed up, but I waited a couple of hours and it just got better as the sun began to set.

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Project Dateline

July 22, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under Behind the Photo, David Stephenson

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Black Gnat, Ky.

In response to a question from friend and fellow photojournalist Jonathan Adams:

“I like what you and Charles Bertram are doing with your Dateline projects, I’m just curious about the background on features.

Since I can’t see the paper in Wyoming how is the feature being played and also what is your search for the subjects and approach to the subject.

Keep them coming. It feels like what Newspaper photography should feel like. It’s time coverage of the other 85% of the population begins to get documented.

Jonathan”

Glad you like the Dateline slide shows. They’ve been a real pleasure to shoot. The play in the paper has been all over the board. The first one was a secondary strip across the top of the feature section. Another couple of them were on the front page, centerpiece. Others were centerpieced on the feature front. I’ll post some pdfs of the pages when I can dig them up.

060703picnicads272
Picnic, Ky.

Our approach to the subjects is almost always the same. Reporter Amy Wilson and meet up early (like 5am), drive, look for signs of any living person when we get there, and start asking questions. We’re usually heading back out of town in under three hours. Amy and I always remark at how willing people are to bring us into their homes and yards to talk about themselves and the place they live. What’s great about these stories is that anything and everything is fair game. This is a great example of why I love my job: I get to explore, meet great people, shoot photos, and get paid for it.

There are gobs of great place names in Kentucky, so there is never a problem finding one. We pretty much just base our decision on not much more than our mood at the time and what direction we haven’t been lately. We’ve also been getting some good recommendations from readers who are responding well to the stories and photos.

Charles Bertram and Dave Perry have also been shooting some of these. Next up, Poodledoo. Or maybe Number One.

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Barefoot, Ky.

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Chicken Bristle, Ky.

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Fairly Fun

July 13, 2006 by Tricia Spaulding  
Filed under Blog

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Fairs are always fun. But the rain is not always fun. Although I have always been a fan of playing in the rain, I have not always been one of photographing in the rain.
I had great luck two nights in a row. It did not rain on me while I was at the Junior League Horse Show, nor did it rain while I was at the Lions Club Bluegrass Fair. Thank goodness.
While I was looking forward to going, there were very few people who decided to show up for one reason or another. There was more rain in the forecast, but I was hopeful the park would fill up. It didn’t.
I found myself wondering if I was capable of finding a unique picture.
I know this picture had been done before, but I think I have become a fan of shadowing. This picture was exposed for the background, which was a very bright sky. I then stopped my fstops down 2 to put the swings in shadow. (My exposure was ISO100, f22, 1/125 shutter.) Of course there are different ways you can attempt this… but I wanted the swings to be fairly focused.

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Fairs are always full of suprises. Don Cassady, a 7-foot-18-inch cowboy, was playing with these children, passing them through his legs. They giggled and giggled as the little boy kept asking the cowboy why he was so tall. Although I didn’t get the exact picture I wanted, I think it is a fun picture.

I was on deadline, and had very little space in the paper for my pictures, so I did not get to stay for very long. But, I did get some practice in on photographing people’s reactions on rollercoasters and rides, which is actually a lot harder than you think it is.

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I found that if you find a person that you think is making/or will make a great expression, you hold the camera still and wait for their cart to make it around. This ride was set up like the tea cups, so the carts went around in a group of four, and then around in a bigger circle, which is hard to follow a cart. I just waited for the cart to come around and then snapped the girls as they tried not to get sick on this ride!

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Early Bird Gets the Worm

July 13, 2006 by Tricia Spaulding  
Filed under Blog

060712jrleaguests012 It really is true.

Being early pays off.

Some days more than others.

I happen to be covering the Junior League Horse Show at The Red Mile last night. I was really nervous about the assignment because I had never covered an event like this, never been to Red Mile and was unsure about how I was going to approach the evening. That is the perfect recipe for butterflies in the tummy and a little sweat on the brow. It is necessary to have confidence in what you do, but sometimes the nerves get the best of you.

The competition didn’t start until 7, but I had another assignment in the barns at 6. I completed it and headed over to find a good spot for the competition and to check out the track. I noticed a group of children with stick horses and realized I had hit the jackpot.
I hung around and noticed these two children that were awfully cute together. I anticipated a few smiles, but this was better. I think it was the funnest surprise I could have found at the track.

060712jrleaguests005 Spike, the Lexington Horseman’s mascot, brought the children onto the track for the race. After Bella Falcone got a good look at him, she couldn’t really decide whether she liked him or not. (She later waved at him, so I guess she decided she like him.)

060712jrleaguests007 This sport is very difficult to photograph. That is all I can really say about it. I was on deadline so I had less than an hour to photograph, which meant only a few classes. (That is how they categorize competitions.) Sports is difficult to photograph because the action happens so quickly, and it tends to all look the same at the end of the day.

I learned a lot about this sport, and I learned a lot about how I should approach sports in general. I am glad I had the opportunity to do something different and to practice sports. The only way to get better is to practice. And I need a lot of it. I just wish the Herald staff didn’t make things look so easy.

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