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A time to heal.

August 30, 2006 by Mark Cornelison  
Filed under Mark Cornelison

Flight 5191 had a major impact on the entire Country. Although I was not part of the coverage on the day of the crash the coverage continues and actually spreads out. As the shock and sadness of the initial news of the crash start to level off for people the true sense of loss is felt and a feeling of "what can I do now" starts to come over all of us. We now know the names and faces of those lost. It does not matter if you knew them or not. It still hurts. Unless you knew someone who was on the flight I’m not sure any of us can understand the true pain but we still feel the loss. The families of the passengers of 5191 have each other now and are trying to cope with totally changed lives.Today they  are going to visit the site of the crash. I hope that gives them some feeling of closure. For the rest of us, like 19 yr old Whitney Johnson, there is a memorial at the Blue Grass Airport in the first parking lot you pass on your right when entering the airport where you can go pay your respects and leave flowers if you like. I hope it helps.
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Concerts, Dylan, and American Idol

August 21, 2006 by Mark Cornelison  
Filed under Mark Cornelison

I just got done shooting the American Idol concert in Louisville at the State Fair. Actually concert may be a stretch  because it was basically Karaoke ,but it was at Freedom Hall so I guess we call it a concert. Concerts are alot of fun to shoot. I love to do it and  to show I am a team player I shoot them all, even if the group performing is not one I would care to see. That brings us to the American Idol tour. As you may have seen we did a pretty nice preview for the concert and Jamie Gumbrecht did a nice review with some of my photos in her blog. The real story is what went on before the show. About a week before the show they emailed us a contract stating that we could only use photos they approved for us to use, and we had to get them contact sheets of our entire shoot (within 7 days) for them to use for Artist promotion however they wanted too. There were a few more conditions about not giving out third party information and not to give out the photos except in Lexington Herald-Leader and McClatchy publications but those were not big deal. The real issue was for them to actually expect someone to give up the rights to their photos and let them use them for free. That is crazy talk. No photographer gives up total rights to anything if they know what they are doing and those that do will learn the hard way one day when they see  an image of theirs on an album cover or billboard and they got nothing in return. I say no photographer gives up rights and to ask a newspaper to do that is unheard of.
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I actually called the Louisville Courier Journal and Velocity magazine to tell them we were not going to shoot under that contract and hope they would join in and essentially boycott the show  unless better terms could be met. Turns out, the people in charge of the contract were very open to crossing out the terms that we could not agree on because they wanted the photos to appear in the Herald-Leader and other publications.  I crossed out pretty much the whole contract except the part about the third party information and went on to shoot! I felt a victory in that I got it done our way  but what was the prize? Shooting American Idol singers in 6 more hours. You call that victory?
Point is from all this is that concert shooting has changed alot from the days when any fan could bring in a camera and shoot to having to have official credentials for an official media outlet. The funny thing is, in my years of shooting concerts (15 years worth), it is always the one hit wonders, boy bands,(Backstreet Boys on first tour) and flash in the pan artists, (Idols) that come up with the ridiculous contracts. Guess they want to make every dime they can while people watch them in their 15 minutes. Such is the case for the Idols, but I do credit their management on not over enforcing the contract. Otherwise they would get no coverage at all. I know alot of people wonder why we cover some concerts and not others and it is not always our call. Bob Dylan, who was recently at Applebees Park, does not allow photographers anymore at his shows. For this reason I let my boss know in advance that there would not be any photos for the paper or online of Mr. Dylan. Why does he have the rule? Who knows? Maybe one too many bad photos out there. That is best I can come up with.

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A “Simple” Handshake

August 6, 2006 by David Perry  
Filed under Behind the Photo, David Perry, Sports

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Every year, about a month before the UK vs. U of L football game, a luncheon and golf outing for coaches, former players and media are held at the University Club golf course in Lexington. The lunch and press conference take place in a park-style shelter outdoors. I’m supposed to get a shot of University of Kentucky head coach Rich Brooks and University of Louisville head coach Bobby Petrino “together”. Problem is, they’re almost never together. Upon their arrival, the media surrounds the coaches separately for interviews and then, at the luncheon, each coach comes up at different times, from opposite sides of the shelter, to a podium for Q&A. I really hate to rely on a posed photo, and lately, there are more and more media there (I counted nine tripods).
Luckily, before the luncheon began, both coaches appeared in a promotional video benefiting visually impaired children. After the video everyone relaxed. As the coaches spontaneously shook hands, someone walked through my frame. But just before they released the handshake, I got a clear shot, but it was a split second opportunity. (Then the coaches began to separate immediately. The published photo is next to last in this sequence.) Point is, sometimes the most “simple” request, and the most unassuming photo you see in the newspaper, might be the most challenging photo of the week to take. And these photos show why professionals rely on motor drive.

TECH INFO: 90mm (zoom); ISO 200; 1/200th/sec.; f.7 (programmed auto exposure); Nikon D2H.

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