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Don’t forget to enjoy the scenery

September 28, 2006 by Pablo Alcala  
Filed under Pablo Alcalá

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Model: NIKON D2H
Lens (mm): 28
ISO: 200
Aperture: 8.0
Shutter: 1/640
Exp. Comp.: 0.0
Flash Comp.: +0.0
Program: Manual
Focus Mode: AF-C
White Bal.: CLOUDY
ICC Profile: Adobe RGB (1998)

On Wednesday, the eight cyclists on the Five Points of Life ride made their way to Lexington on their long journey from Ottowa to Miami.

When I heard about these cyclists coming through, I drove up and down their route earlier looking for a spot to highlight bluegrass’s signature rock fences and rolling hills. I found this spot where I could stand out of traffic’s way in the median of Paris Pike and layer the cyclists between the rock fences.

I am also a cyclist. I really started to appreciate the beauty of the Bluegrass when I started cycling four years ago, a year after I move here.  There is so much more to see at 15mph on a rural road  than 50  on main road or 75 on a six lane interstate.

While I can’t think of a career I would rather be in than this, the idea of taking a few months to see the United States or another country by bike is appealing. 

By the way, these riders are raising awareness about how important blood and tissue donors are.  They had local help from students, faculty and staff at Transylvania University, and the  Crowne Plaza Campbell House (yeah, they were roughing it) and other groups that I have probably left out.  They are enjoying today’s rain on their way to Somerset.

Check out their cause at:
http://www.fivepointsoflife.com/

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Signature Style

September 22, 2006 by Janet Worne  
Filed under Blog

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Ever wonder what it is about a photographer’s work that gives it a recognizable style? It was a thrill for me the first time someone told me they could always spot my photos without looking at the credit line. But they could never explain what it was that clued them in. It took a deep thinker like Sam Abell, a former National Geographic photographer, to enlighten me. Check out my story in today’s Weekender and on Kentucky.com to read about his theory of photographic signatures and how they can evolve from someone’s childhood.

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Bruce Almighty

September 20, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under David Stephenson, Sports

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When you’re told to go photograph Tennessee basketball coach Bruce Pearl, you generally think you’re heading to Rupp Arena or hitting southbound I-75 to Knoxville.

As a general rule, when you enter a high school gymnasium in Kentucky, it’s not going to look like opening day of deer season and you certainly won’t hear the band playing Rocky Top.

Instead, I headed north to Maysville last night and entered a kind of dreamland.

“It’s like the Twilight Zone, isn’t it?” said Kelly Clark, a former basketball player for Mason County High School in Jerry Tipton’s story in today’s Herald-Leader about Bruce Pearl’s visit to Maysville on Tuesday.

The heartfelt adoration that Mason Countians holds for their hometown hero Chris Lofton apparently makes them do crazy things, like root for UT where Lofton currently stars.

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Pearl’s visit to Maysville included a stop at the Boys and Girls Club,
a stop at the Mason County gym for a public speech, and a long chat
with the Mason County head coach Chris O’Hearn (including some
conversation about Macon County’s current star, Darius Miller).

In a rather, umm, bold gesture, Ky. State Representative Mike Denham
presented Pearl with a certificate making him a Kentucky Colonel at the
end of a Rotary Club dinner.

A sea of orange in a Kentucky high school gym. The Tennessee head coach
being named a Kentucky Colonel. It’s not natural. I’m ready to wake up now.

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The 500mm Mirror F8

September 19, 2006 by David Perry  
Filed under David Perry, Web/Camera Tech

Now that the 5191 crash events have settled down, the 911 anniversary is over, and there is a little bit of breathing room between sporting events, I’d thought I’d let the newer members of the photo community see why I always have a dinosaur in my gear–that is, a Nikkor 500mm f8 reflex mirror lens made in the mid-1970s. It’s very lightweight, and it works on the same principal as a mirror reflex telescope. The lens belonged to my late friend, photographer, and photofinisher extraordinaire, Paul Lambert. I’ve used it for about three years now.
On the day of the Comair 5191 crash, there was no time to grab a shared “pool” 500mm f4 auto focus lens from the office, so when I found myself assigned, quickly, to run over to the Campbell House hotel to photograph victims’ families arriving for briefings from Comair, I pulled out the 500mm f8 mirror. The media were kept about 100 yards from the front door (as you can see, below). Also, you can see a full-frame outtake I shot from the press position we were given. An 80-200 zoom just wouldn’t have been enough.
So, while the 500 f8 mirror lens has a lot of limitations (outdoor use only because it’s so slow, and it’s only aperture is f8, AND it’s manual focus), this old dinosaur can be handy.
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Reflex

Reflexside

The reason this old lens works on modern cameras is that since it has only one aperture, no electronic couplings are needed to “feed” information back to the camera. Just put the camera on aperture priority, and set a plus 1 exposure compensation. The reason for the plus 1 compensation: without the feedback from the lens, the camera defaults to “thinking” there’s a f5.6 setting on the lens. Of course, you can also shoot with manuel settings.

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You never know who you’re gonna meet in this job.

September 12, 2006 by Pablo Alcala  
Filed under Pablo Alcalá

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Liz Montgomery shows her tattoos at Clark Art and Antiques which will be part of an art exhibit during the Gallery Hop Lexington, Ky, Sept. 12, 2006. Pablo Alcalá/Staff

Date: 9/12/06
Model: NIKON D2H
Lens (mm): 17
ISO: 200
Aperture: 11
Shutter: 1/6
Exp. Comp.: 0.0
Program: Manual
ICC Profile: Adobe RGB (1998)

Yesterday I was photographing a priest and others in a candlelit solemn ceremony. Today I’m in an antique store, photographing tattooed folks with studio lighting while hoping a little old lady doesn’t walk in to see Mark’s self portrait he has on his backside. I haven’t checked tomorrow’s assignments yet.

This assignment was supposed to be shot in our studio, but the story just cried out for location lighting. Mark, Liz, and others will be a sort of living-art-exhibit of tattoos at Clark Art and Antiques during the Gallery Hop this Friday. I checked with Tom Clark, who owns the store, let the subjects know of the change and set up over there. This is a preview of some photos that will be on our site later this week and in our Weekender.  The subjects were great people, and nothing was broken, and no one was offended. 

While I don’t have any tatoos myself, and don’t plan to, I think it’s great that we as a newspaper are not ignoring this kind of thing. 

For the photo-technocrati out there, I used a White lighting 800 on about 3/4 power with a grid for my main light and had an Alien Bee 400 full power with a tighter grid spot on the Lexington sign above the door. I was bracketing with a slow shutter speed (1/4 second to 1/20th second) to bring in the overcast window light and aperture between f11 and f16.  Using Pocket Wizard radio remotes was great. Worrying about ac cords knocking things over in an antique store makes me nervous enough with out worrying about a cord from my camera to the light getting caught on something while I’m shooting.

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Mark Hurte shows his tattoos at Clark Art and Antiques which will be part of an art exhibit during the Gallery Hop Lexington, Ky, Sept. 12, 2006. Pablo Alcalá/Staff

Date: 9/12/06
Model: NIKON D2H
Lens (mm): 17
ISO: 200
Aperture: 13
Shutter: 1/4
Exp. Comp.: 0.0
Program: Manual

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