From the staff of the Lexington Herald-LeaderKentucky.comSubscribe to Heraldleaderphoto.comNews FeedSubscribe to Heraldleaderphoto.comComments

Mummie’s the word

October 30, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under Blog

061025mummieads242

061025mummieads072_1

061025mummieads310_1

   

Another installment of Project Dateline under our belts this week. Just in time for Halloween, Amy Wilson and I took a trip to Mummie located in Jackson County near Tyner. And as usual, we got lucky with the weather and had a nice frost combined with some good fall color.

Amy’s story is here, and more photos on Heraldleaderphoto.com here.

061025mummieads458

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Everything Looks Up to Me

October 17, 2006 by David Perry  
Filed under David Perry

OK, let’s pretend you’ve been to so many years of architecture school, think you know what you’re doing, and then are asked to design a new stadium in say, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. You then forget that both teams stand up, that the “chain gang” officials stand up, the cheerleaders stand up and the cops stand up on the sidelines of a typical football game. Oh yeah, you also forget that photographers stand up also on the sidelines. So forgetting all that, you build the fans’ seats, all the way around the stadium, ON THE FRONT ROW AT FIELD LEVEL. So therefore, those fans can’t see the action. So the solution, of course, is that everyone aforementioned gets to stand up EXCEPT the photographers. OK, I’m complaining somewhat because I’m 56 years old and not as spry as I used to be (not that I was ever really spry). But also, this requirement that photogs kneel the whole game is dangerous as well. It is tough enough for photographers to get out of the way from players’ rushing out of bounds when the photos are standing, much less when the photographer has to get up from a kneeling position.

It does seem that modern stadium designers have learned a lesson and have built the front row higher. But why, like so many things, did that common sense realizations take decades?
061014uklsusdp170

061014uklsusdp575_1

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

What’s good for the Goose…

October 15, 2006 by Pablo Alcala  
Filed under Blog

061014girlsoccspa569_1

What are the chances of Saturday’s  girl’s and boy’s 26th District soccer games ending in a shoot out?  Oh well, at least I earned my paycheck this week.  All four teams move on to the next round, good luck to all. 

061014boysoccspa015_1
…is good for the Gander. 

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Battle of Perryville

October 8, 2006 by David Stephenson  
Filed under David Stephenson, Lighting

061005perryvilleads030

This is my second time covering the Battle of Perryville reenactment which took place this weekend. It was designated as the National Reenactment this year which meant that there would be thousands more reenactors than usual.

I covered Friday’s happenings so we could get something in the paper on Saturday, letting readers know about the event. I focused on the soldiers from both camps as they prepared for the next day’s battles. I also recorded some audio and put together an audio slideshow that night.

The photo above is of a group of ambrotypes drying on a rack. These photos were shot by Wendell Decker of Vintage Image Studios in Bowling Green (sorry, he doesn’t have a web site). He uses original wet plate technology to shoot photos of the reenactors on site.

Saturday morning I arrived at 6 a.m. to shoot the sunrise battle. It was a beautiful morning, with a setting, full, Harvest Moon. Some fog hung close to the ground. It was so dark, I couldn’t even see anything but I finally heard the cavalry moving across a field about 150 yards from me. Then, the most stunning thing happened. The spectators who had arrived to watch the battle began taking photos with their point and shoots. Flashes started firing along the rope line where the spectators were assembled. I set the camera at a slow shutter speed and took an educated guess at the focus. I had hoped that during the 1/2 second exposure that I might catch someone’s flash.

061007perryvilleads011
Canon 1DMkII
Lens (mm): 70-200 2.8
ISO: 1600
Aperture: 2.8
Shutter: 1/2

The battle soon began, and there wasn’t even a hint of sunrise. All I could see was the blaze of fire coming from the end of muskets. I couldn’t find anything to focus on, and the battlefield was soon filled with fog and smoke, making it even more difficult to see. Witnessing it in person was a sight to behold. Thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers, scores of horses, all facing off and shooting at each other in the predawn light. The sound was just as exhilarating as the scene.

I kept shooting as the sky began to lighten. Finally, the sun began to creep up over the trees. But almost as soon as the light hit the battlefield, the fighting stopped. My first frame was shot at 6:41 a.m. The final frame was at 8:14 a.m.

Visit Heraldleaderphoto.com to view a multimedia show from both days of shooting the Battle of Perryville.

061007perryvilleads042

Canon 1DMkII
Lens (mm): 24-70 2.8
ISO: 400
Aperture: 4.0
Shutter: 1/13

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

You have to remember the little details.

October 2, 2006 by admin  
Filed under Snappers

061002paradeaah034

So Saturday night I was working for the Kernel covering the UK football game.  While I was there I was talking with HL staffer David Stephenson and remembered him saying he would be in a parade Monday.  Generally I would ignore this, but for some reason it stayed in my head.  Then this morning I received a call to cover a parade tonight, for some reason it popped in my head that Stephenson would be there and I kept my eyes peeled as the bag pipes came by.  Sure enough he was there.

I figured the rest of the staff would enjoy this, so I posted it.  I mean how often do you see a friend of yours in a kilt, playing the bagpipes?

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print