From the staff of the Lexington Herald-LeaderKentucky.comSubscribe to Heraldleaderphoto.comNews FeedSubscribe to Heraldleaderphoto.comComments

Football photo day!

I blogged awhile back about having a two day span of shooting that I was excited about. A fashion shoot one day, and two of the top quarterbacks in the nation the next. As you may have seen, the quarterbacks were published on the front of today’s college football preview section. It is always a task thinking up good ideas for sports preview covers and then trying to organize the shoot, and get the people on board who I need to help me. This usually includes Sports Information staff at UK and sometimes other schools.The last few years Louisville has figured into my cover shoots with star quarterback Brian Brohm. I began shooting Brian when he was a senior in high school at Trinity. It was a fairly quick shoot that day and the photos I got from the shoot went over great. Brian loved the shot too and we got to be friends over the next few years. It always helps to have whomever you are shooting working with you, and being a part of the process. Whether it be a certain expression you are working to get, or pulling them to a location that is out of the norm.This may sound fairly simple but getting two of the nations top quarterbacks to get together takes a little planning. No school wants to go too far, or to the other school for example so some neutral ground is sought out. Luckily for me this was not a hard thing this year as the Governor’s Cup luncheon was in Simpsonville, Ky. this year so we all agreed the shoot would take place there.Soon after we were asked if we minded sharing time with the Courier-Journal who wanted to shoot the same thing. THEN we were told that ESPN was doing a shot of Brian Brohm that day too. I was not concerned about the extra photo shoots as long as it did not cut into my shoot time, which is usually limited to under half and hour. I took our intern, Tricia Spaulding, with me to help with the light set up, and transport, and since she was going our photo director, Ron Garrison, thought it would be a good time for her to shoot her first video. Here it is for your enjoyment as a record of a condensed photo shoot featuring photographers from other publications, some golfers who were at the site that day seeking autographs, and even the re-emergence of the old Crown Graphic camera I break out for special assignments!

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Getting the Boot

August 24, 2007 by admin  
Filed under David Stephenson, Videos


The University of Kentucky is using a new, high-tech system to quickly scan the parking lots for parking violators. Watch as parking coordinator Bill Ayers uses the system and has to cope with a student whose truck is about to be towed.

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Goodbye

August 17, 2007 by Janet Worne  
Filed under Blog

Today is an emotional day for me. It is the closing page of an important chapter in my life. Tomorrow I will begin a new one.

It is my last day as a Herald-Leader staff photographer. I am leaving Kentucky for the love of a good man, Paul Mansfield, who was originally from Lexington. I will move to New Mexico where he has lived for a number of years and I will make the switch to freelance photography.

I will miss this paper, this town, and especially all of my friends and co-workers. I came here 18 years ago as a widow and raised two wonderful daughters, Heather and Hilary. For the last ten years, I have volunteered with the Kentucky Search Dog Association and have spent many late nights following my dog through the hills of Eastern Kentucky looking for missing people.
8x10

The Herald-Leader has been a good, family-friendly place to work and I have many great memories. I have photographed a wide range of people from presidents to homeless people and everyone in-between. I have seen death, race riots and injustices as well as many moments of joy and compassion. I have met some amazing and inspiring people, some rich and some not so rich.
Ali

Much like in a mystery novel this last chapter has ended with somewhat of a cliffhanger. I have an idea of what might happen but there are many unanswered questions. Will I be able to bring in enough income? Will I adjust well to the altitude and desert heat? Will I find another good K9 Search and Rescue team? Will I find friends as wonderful as I have made here? Will I be able to top the work I’ve done at the Herald-Leader?

Tomorrow I’ll turn the page and find out. Wish me luck.
060428rolexjw

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Rappelling

August 9, 2007 by Charles Bertram  
Filed under Charles Bertram

070809caveacb145
Volunteers Cindy Lackey and Thor Bahrman rappel down the 80-foot vertical shaft

It took me 30 years at the Herald-Leader to be assigned to my first AND LAST assignment involving rappelling. Earlier today reporter Bill Estep and myself covered the cave restoration project at the Saltpeter Pit Cave near Shopville (Pulaski County), Ky. After receiving a quick lesson in both the operation of the gear and the necessary safety precautions we began our trips down the 80-foot vertical shaft. It was actually kind of exhilarating-once I got over the weird sensation of leaning, in a sitting position, over the edge of the cave. I was tethered to Lance Mitchell, a highly qualified rappelling expert, and our trip down only took about 5 minutes. Bill followed with the help of Thor Bahrman. Once on the bottom, Bill interviewed the volunteers and workers while I made photographs. We were done with our work in about 30 minutes and that’s where it got interesting. There were two people that needed to exit the cave before us. What we didn’t expect was that it took an hour and a half for them to make the trip up. Despite equipment issues, Bill made it up in reasonable time. Then it was my turn. I don’t know the correct term for when you rappel “up” so I’ll just call it by the more common name of “torture”. It took me over an hour, dealing with equipment I had never used before, using muscles I didn’t know I had, to make it to the top. My guide, Thor, was super helpful and very patient as I progressed inches at a time. Several times during the ascent we had to stop to re-adjust the bootstraps I was using to push myself up the rope. Upon reaching the top, I had to have several bottles of water and Gatorade to recover from the climb, which started in 56-degree comfort and ended in upper 90-degree misery. The volunteers asked me if I would ever rappel again and I gave them a loud “NO”. But now that I’ve rested and given it some thought, I’m sure I’d do it again as long as the photographs are worth it and they install an elevator for the return trip. Posted by Charles Bertram

070809caveacb219

Bill Estep and Charles Bertram

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

A True Wide Angle

August 9, 2007 by David Perry  
Filed under David Perry, Web/Camera Tech

One advantage of the new Canon 5-D camera all the staff has now is that it is a full frame digital.  That is, the sensor records the image, at the true millimeter, just like the "old" film days.  So while our Nikons (and, yes, some other models of Canon like the Mark III, 30-D, etc.) record a magnification of the actual focal length (a 20mm would become a 30mm due to the smaller digital sensor in those cameras), the 5-D gives a much wider view.
The photo below of Mid-Town Barbers owner Brian Stortzum was my hot weather feature I shot Aug. 8 as he used an umbrella to carry his own shade.  It was one of our Kentucky.com updates and was up on the home page for a couple of hours.  You may have heard of photogs doing a "Hail Mary", shooting blind by holding the camera overhead and hoping the framing is good.  Well, this is a little like that, but I shot very LOW to the ground, not looking through the camera and hoping the framing was good!  You can see from the other shot that shooting a low "Hail Mary" takes a lot of frames to make it right.  The power lines are brutal.

070808hotadp200_copy

Canon 5-D, 400 ISO, 20mm (zoom lens) f13, 1/400th, aperture priority.

070808hotadp197_2

Share:
  • email
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • StumbleUpon
  • Fark
  • NewsVine
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print

Next Page »